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You can’t tell which seemingly wacky ideas are going

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You can’t tell which seemingly wacky ideas are going to turn out to be right, and nearly all ideas that turn out to be great breakthroughs start out sounding like terrible ideas.  So if you want a culture that innovates, you can’t have a culture where you allow the concept of heresy—if you allow the concept at all, it tends to spread.  When we move from strenuous debate about ideas to casting the people behind the ideas as heretics, we gradually stop debate on all controversial ideas.

This is uncomfortable, but it’s possible we have to allow people to say disparaging things about gay people if we want them to be able to say novel things about physics. [1] Of course we can and should say that ideas are mistaken, but we can’t just call the person a heretic.  We need to debate the actual idea.

Political correctness often comes from a good place—I think we should all be willing to make accommodations to treat others well.  But too often it ends up being used as a club for something orthogonal to protecting actual victims.  The best ideas are barely possible to express at all, and if you’re constantly thinking about how everything you say might be misinterpreted, you won’t let the best ideas get past the fragment stage.

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Born in New York and raised in nearby Connecticut, she began coding and designing websites at just 11 years old and went on to study graphic design at the Rhode Island School of Design before landing an internship at Pentagram.

From there, she worked as an associate art director at Print magazine and enjoyed seeing her work published in titles such as the New York Times. In 2010, she met Stefan Sagmeister who looked through her portfolio and offered her a job at his design studio. Two years later, Walsh was made partner at age 25.

Aside from working with clients including Levi's and Adobe, Jessica is behind 40 Days of Dating and 12 Kinds of Kindness, two recent projects she's enjoyed with long-time friend and designer, Timothy Goodman. It was the latter that ultimately led to Ladies Wine & Design, creative meetups for female designers in 250 cities across the globe. We chatted to Jessica about her career so far.

Canal Street Market is a carefully curated retail market, food hall & community space open year-round at 265 Canal Street.

It was a risk, but I learned so much working with her and her team at Pentagram. I threw myself into the work and worked nights and weekends and also took on freelance photography projects to pay rent.

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Paula recommended me for an art director position at the design magazine, Print. It was at Print that I developed a surreal, colourful, handcrafted, playful style. I started working there in 2008 when the economy crashed, and the magazine’s budgets were slashed for illustration and photography.

I accepted this limitation as an opportunity to do things myself and started creating elaborate handmade set designs, which I photographed in my apartment. Eventually, people began to recognise my style and hire me for larger projects.

  • They were not in design, but I consider them in other ways.
  • I interned at Apple, and they offered me a well-paid job.
  • I threw myself into the work and worked nights and weekends and also took on freelance photography projects to pay rent.
  • I accepted this limitation as an opportunity to do things myself

Born in New York and raised in nearby Connecticut, she began coding and designing websites at just 11 years old and went on to study graphic design at the Rhode Island School of Design before landing an internship at Pentagram.

From there, she worked as an associate art director at Print magazine and enjoyed seeing her work published in titles such as the New York Times. In 2010, she met Stefan Sagmeister who looked through her portfolio and offered her a job at his design studio. Two years later, Walsh was made partner at age 25.

Aside from working with clients including Levi's and Adobe, Jessica is behind 40 Days of Dating and 12 Kinds of Kindness, two recent projects she's enjoyed with long-time friend and designer, Timothy Goodman. It was the latter that ultimately led to Ladies Wine & Design, creative meetups for female designers in 250 cities across the globe. We chatted to Jessica about her career so far.

Born in New York and raised in nearby Connecticut, she began coding and designing websites at just 11 years old and went on to study graphic design at the Rhode Island School of Design before landing an internship at Pentagram.

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From there, she worked as an associate art director at Print magazine and enjoyedWe chatted to Jessica about her career so far work published in titles such as the New York Times. In 2010, she met Stefan Sagmeister who looked through her portfolio and offered her a job at his design studio. Two years later, Walsh was made partner at age 25.

Aside from working with clients including Levi's and Adobe, Jessica is behind 40 Days of Dating and 12 Kinds of Kindness, two recent projects she's enjoyed with long-time friend and designer, Timothy Goodman. It was the latter that ultimately led to Ladies Wine & Design, creative meetups for female designers in 250 cities across the globe. We chatted to Jessica about her career so far.

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Credit - Priya Mistry

Work published in titles such as the New York Times. In 2010, she met Stefan Sagmeister who looked through her portfolio and offered her a job at his design studio. Two years later, Walsh was made partner at age 25.

You can’t tell which seemingly wacky ideas are going to turn out to be right, and nearly all ideas that turn out to be great breakthroughs start out sounding like terrible ideas.  So if you want a culture that innovates, you can’t have a culture where you allow the concept of heresy—if you allow the concept at all, it tends to spread.  When we move from strenuous debate about ideas to casting the people behind the ideas as heretics, we gradually stop debate on all controversial ideas.

This is uncomfortable, but it’s possible we have to allow people to say disparaging things about gay people if we want them to be able to say novel things about physics. [1] Of course we can and should say that ideas are mistaken, but we can’t just call the person a heretic.  We need to debate the actual idea.

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